Thursday, October 1, 2009



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Psychogeography is the study of the effects of the urban environment on the emotions and behaviour of individuals.  It caught my attention the other day.  For me it blends hobby (haiku) with professional interests (urban design).  

This school of thought relies on the 'derive' - where you walk with the sole objective of letting your interests in the immediate surrounds guide your route and being open to encounters along the way - much like taking an urban ginko.

almost home
where the road rises
baking bread


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22 comments:

  1. oh this is really interesting, Dalloway :)

    wishes,
    devika

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  2. excellent thought provoking

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  3. This is a very interesting post Emma...

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  4. Excellent. Good use of the word 'rises'

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  5. I get suitably lost in this. Am I looking up at the sky and trees of down from a hill at the rooftops or both? It confuses my little brain for a few moments with my eyes going all over the image.

    I'm doing a sedentry derive thing about the photo. Appropriate, really.

    You've got me reading the image emphathetic with your intent. It's a little dizzying.

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  6. I really liked this thought-provoking piece Emma and would have tagged it as very good haibun. (Can't haibun include a photo as well?)

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  7. I have such streets in my neighborhood! They lift your spirit ... like this haiku.

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  8. Many thanks for your comments.

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  9. Emma,
    __I can only add my... WOW; as a boy, I remember cresting the Birch St. rise, where often the smell of bread from Ma's kitchen taunted me! Grand! _m

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  10. This is so interesting and wonderful. Love it.

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  11. Derive. What an interesting word. Thank you for this.

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  12. Thanks Magyar, Kristin and Kurt.

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  13. i enjoyed this haibun very much; its interesting, as well as informative

    much love
    gillena

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  14. A great haibunesque work. It has got the strong breath of western-style-literature and carries a picture which reminds me of World War II sceneries, taken as a photograph in Japan. I am flabbergasted ...

    Best wishes
    Ralf

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  15. thanks for your comments Gillena

    Ralf, I love it when folk see things in the pictures that I hadnt seen... it makes me look differently at my own work... many thanks!

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  16. Hi Emma, a very nice haiku. It's starting to get cold. 34 Degrees Fahrenheit, which is almost 0 Celsius. To me, the smell of baking bread suggests warmth on an autumn day - just the thing.

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  17. The haiku gives a very welcoming feeling...the welcome of home and the welcome of fresh baked bread. Nothing says home to me more than something baking, especially bread.

    Adelaide

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  18. Yikes thats cold, Patrick... and its not even winter! Just how cold does it get upinvermont?

    Many thanks Adelaide xx

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  19. Fascinating...part of me though is afraid of getting in too deep :) Love your stuff! where have i been? hiding again :)

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  20. Thanks for the info on psychogeography, very interesting. I also loved the rise of the road and the bread, very welcoming.

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Thanks for taking the time to write something.